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Collection Services Policy and Procedure Manual: PRESERVATION

AALL Preservation Resources

You will need to login to the AALL website http://www.aallnet.org then go to the TS-SIS home page, Resources, Technical Services Links to find Preservation Resources which include:

Guidelines and Tips; Organizations and Vendors; Digital Preservation; Archivists in Law Libraries; Staff Awareness Guide; and Preservation on the Cheap.

Temp & Humidity desired ranges for libraries

This information is from Northeast Document Conservation Center manual, 3rd edition, 1999


"The recommendation is a stable temperature no higher than 70 degrees F, and a stable relative humidity between 30-50%....Maintaining stable conditions is of great importance.  An institution should chose a temperature and relative humidity within the recommended ranges that can be maintained 24 hrs. a day, 365 days a year.  The climate control system should never be turned off, and settings should not be lowered at night, on weekends, or at other times when the library or archives is closed.  Additional costs incurred by keeping the system in constant operations will be far less than the cost of future conservation treatment to repair damage caused by poor climate....Both experience and scientific testing indicate that the useful life of materials is significantly extended by maintenance of moderate, stable levels of temperature and relative humidity." 

PICTURE

Mold problems

From the booklet Managing a Mold Invasion: guidelines for disaster response  put out by the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts "Mold is active and will grow when the relative humidity reaches or exceeds 70-75% and remains there for some period of time.  Elevated temperatures increase the rate of growth", c1996

PICTURE

General Information

Identifying Material Appropriate for In-House Repair

A typical hard cover book will need attention at several stages in its library life:

·         Original trade binding as it comes from the publisher

·         Minor mending to extend the useful life of the publisher's trade binding

·         Rebinding when the trade binding becomes too worn or the sewing breaks

·         Boxing, reformatting or discard when the paper becomes too brittle

This manual will primarily focus on minor mending techniques that will extend access to the original book, yet address damage that impedes the use of the book.

Working Definition of a Simple Book Repair:

For the purpose of this manual and as a working definition for the Dartmouth College Libraries General Collections, simple book repair is defined as those repairs that meet any of the following criteria:

·         The repair can be done by staff who have completed training in simple book repair and with the equipment and supplies readily available.

·         The damaged book is needed by a patron and/or is a reserve book

·         The book is not brittle. If it is ONLY a wrapper will be prepared to protect it while circulating, no other repairs will be attempted.

How Books Appropriate For In-House Repair Are Identified

Damaged books are identified by both library staff and patrons. To make the decision to repair a book in-house requires that each staff member involved in the process be familiar with and understand the implications of treatment and/or other options available. If the over-arching goal of preservation is access, then book repair becomes one option for providing access to a particular book. Briefly, the other options commonly available are ordering a replacement copy of the damaged book, sending the book for commercial binding, reformatting the book, and/or boxing the original material. Each option has a cost, both in staff time and materials. Unfortunately, there are no hard and fast rules for making these decisions. Rather, a number of factors should be considered by staff.

Some common questions you might ask before repairing a book:

1. Bibliographers

·         Is the damaged book worth retaining?

·         If not, would Special Collections be interested in the book?

·         If book is worth retaining is it still available?

·         If the book is available, is the cost of ordering a new book less than the cost of repairing the original?

2. At the Circulation Desk

·  Is the book needed immediately by a patron?

·  Are there other copies available?

·  Have I consulted the appropriate bibliographer?

·  Have I consulted Preservation Services staff?

3. In Preservation Services

·         Is the book needed immediately by a patron?

·         Is the book brittle?

·         Is the repair simple?

·         Do I have time, training, and supplies needed to complete the repair?

·         Would it be easier to send the book to the commerical binder for treatment

 

Guiding Principles of Simple Book Repair

Reversibility: Any treatment applied to a book should be reversible, that is it can be undone easily at a later date. If only the equipment, supplies, and techniques outlined in this manual are used, reversibility should not be a problem. In reality, only enclosure of the book (as in boxing) is truly reversible.

Do No Harm: This is a corollary to reversibility. If a repair seems difficult or you think you do not have the skill to complete the repair, set the book aside.

Expediency: Almost any non-brittle book can be repaired, given enough time and the proper equipment. Simple book repair implies that the repair will not take hours or days of staff time. As you become more comfortable with simple book repair, the decision to repair in-house versus sending the book to a commercial bindery will be easier to make.

problem. In reality, only enclosure of the book (as in boxing) is truly reversible.

Do No Harm: This is a corollary to reversibility. If a repair seems difficult or you think you do not have the skill to complete the repair, set the book aside.

Expediency: Almost any non-brittle book can be repaired, given enough time and the proper equipment. Simple book repair implies that the repair will not take hours or days of staff time. As you become more comfortable with simple book repair, the decision to repair in-house versus sending the book to a commercial bindery will be easier to make.

Requirements:

·         The order of pages must be preserved regardless of the repair or reformat.

·         Books must have a protective cover to the pages.

 

 

 

 

not sure where this information came from/2012

Preservation

How to care for leather books

http://www.ehow.com/how_12204964_treat-dry-scuffed-leather-book-binding.html

 

 

Library of Congress care of books

http://www.loc.gov/preservation/care/books.html

 

 

ARL report from 2009

http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/safeguarding-collections.pdf

 

 

Northeast Document Conservation Center

http://www.nedcc.org/home.php

 

 

800 N. Harvey Oklahoma City, OK 73102 405.208.5271